Knicks vs Pistons – 1-7-14 – Game Recap

Written by William Lee

The New York Knicks welcomed the struggling Detroit Pistons to Madison Square Garden Tuesday night. Raymond Felton returned to the starting lineup after a six game absence from a strained groin injury. Kenyon Martin was also inserted into the starting lineup replacing the injured Tyson Chandler. Detroit was missing Rodney Stuckey due to a sore shoulder, which is very fortunate for New York because he was a key reason why Detroit was able to pull out a victory in November when these two teams met early in the season with 21 points and 5 assist in the previous game.

This game would start off ugly, with both teams shooting a dismal from the field in the first half. Both teams struggled, shooting sub .400 in a tied ball game 41-41. The Pistons dominated inside with 30 points in the paint. This is not an aberration since the Detroit Pistons are ranked second in the league in most field goals made within five feet, and within 5-9 feet as well. This is not surprising with the large frontline of Greg Monroe, Josh Smith and Andre Drummond. This combination scored 71% of the Pistons’ total offense in the first half. At the half Drummond had 11 points and 8 rebounds, Monroe also helped carry the offense with 12 points. Josh Smith only had 6 points but dominated the glass with 11 rebounds and got his teammates involved with 4 assist. Continue reading

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Knicks @ Celtics – 12-13-13 – Game Recap

Written by William Lee

This is fucking depressing…..

The New York Knicks Friday night looked to take revenge on their Boston Celtic Atlantic Division rival for the Sunday matinee beating. With the 41 point lost fresh in the memory, the Knicks did not lack effort this night. Jared Sullinger got it started for the Celtics destroying Andrea Bargnani in the post, going a perfect 3/3 in the opening period for eight points. Carmelo Anthony kept the Knicks in the game scoring double digits in the first quarter. Courtney Lee in three minute of play in the first quarter, scored eight points, making two very difficult threes, both with the shot clock winding down, including a buzzer beater to end the first quarter, giving Boston a 29-26 lead.

New York could not play defense without fouling in the second quarter, sending Celtics to the free throw line on the first three Boston possessions to start the period. This sparked a 16-2 run to begin the quarter for the Celtics, giving Boston a 45-28 lead. The Knicks were over the foul limit with 8:04 remaining in the second quarter due to poor defense, and Sullinger’s continued dominance in the post, adding nine more points in the quarter. The Celtics though did not take advantage of this fact, going to the line only twice for the rest of the quarter. Carmelo Anthony carried the Knicks to the end of the first half, leading New York on a 13-3 run to end the period. Anthony was single handedly responsible for 11points during the run, scoring nine points, working it in the post and handing out an assist to Bargnani for a layup. This cut into the deficit to six, with the Celtics leading 54-48 after the first half.

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My Thoughts on the NBA’s Hard Cap Issue

I just read a lockout article in support of the players.  I have to say the author, Howard Bryant must be Kobe’s brother because the arguments made here are completely irrational.

In summary, he’s saying that there is parity in the NBA.  The owners argue that there isn’t enough parity and that they want to base their model more like the NFL’s where there is.  The author says the NFL does not have parity.  He bases his argument on stats like this “In the NFL, the league of the vaunted hard salary cap and far less guaranteed money for its players, 20 of the 44 teams in the NFC of AFC title games came from top-10 TV markets”  OK, so 31% of the teams played in 45% of the title games.  I think that’s pretty even considering some teams get ravaged by injuries or bad management every year.

To say the NBA has parity is ridiculous.  3 teams from the west have made the finals since 1999.  12 years.  3 teams.  Sounds pretty lopsided to me.  In the east there have been a number of teams that made the finals, but every year there are about 4 good teams and 11 horrible ones.  Yes the Knicks have one of the highest salaries and haven’t done anything, but that doesn’t mean having no cap is a good system.  In poker if you start each hand with pocket aces you might not win every hand but you definitely start off with an advantage.  If you have good ownership, having the highest salary is a huge advantage.  (see Lakers and Yankees).  Those two teams don’t win every year but they’ve made the finals a hell of a lot more than any other team in their respective sports.

I’m all for a hard cap.  It’s boring if the same teams are in it every year.  Why not just contract the league to 8 teams if the others aren’t going to have a chance at being competitive?  And yes I’m aware that Oklahoma City is a very small market and are doing alright for themselves, but last I checked there is still only one Kevin Durant, so not every small market team is going to be able to draft him to become relevant.